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MVC Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting Summary: Connecting the Dots for Value-Based Healthcare

MVC Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting Summary: Connecting the Dots for Value-Based Healthcare

The Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) held its first collaborative-wide meeting of 2023 last Friday. A total of 90 leaders registered, representing 52 different hospitals, 13 physician organizations (POs), and five stakeholder organizations from across the state of Michigan. This meeting’s theme of “Connecting the Dots: Celebrating 10 Years of Insights into Value-Based Healthcare” focused on interdisciplinary collaboration, care transitions, alternative sites of care, and MVC’s 10-year anniversary kickoff.

MVC Director Hari Nathan, MD, PhD, kicked off Friday’s meeting with an update from the MVC Coordinating Center (see slides). He welcomed MVC’s newest team members, Site Engagement Coordinator Kristy Degener and Senior Data Analyst Julia Mantey. Dr. Nathan highlighted the successes delivered by the Coordinating Center since October’s collaborative-wide meeting, including the release of MVC’s first Qualified Entity Public Report, which looked at 30-day unplanned rehospitalization for patients discharged to home health after high-volume medical and surgical episodes, as well as measures of post-discharge outpatient follow-up for congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Dr. Nathan also announced Medicare Part D pharmacy claims as MVC’s newest data source and highlight recent push report releases – sepsis, joint replacement, cardiac rehabilitation, and preoperative testing – aimed at increasing the amount of meaningful, benchmarked data available to members. Rounding out the welcome address, Dr. Nathan showcased a 10-year anniversary video featuring members of MVC’s leadership team, past and present.

MVC Co-Director Michael P. Thompson, PhD, MPH followed Dr. Nathan with an update on the MVC Component of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program, noting that final scorecards for Program Year (PY) 2022 were distributed in March. For the 2022 - 2023 program cycle, hospital members selected two conditions to be measured for the 30-day episode spending component of the program - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), colectomy (non-cancer), congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), joint replacement (hip and knee), pneumonia, or spine surgery - and are eligible to receive up to two bonus points for completing a survey on each of their episode conditions. Dr. Thompson presented a snapshot of the PY2022 evaluation (Figure 1), noting all participating hospitals scored at least two points and over a third of participating hospitals scored the maximum of 10 points (mean: 7.7 points, median: 8 points). Turning to PY2023, the group was reminded that mid-year scorecards will be distributed to participating hospitals in the summer of 2023 and bonus point questionnaires will be due in November.

Figure 1.

Following Dr. Thompson’s update on the MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P program, Senior Data Analyst Kristen Hassett, MPH, introduced MVC’s new Emergency Department (ED)–based episodes, which were developed in collaboration with the Michigan Emergency Department Improvement Collaborative (MEDIC). The new ED-based episodes are initialized by an ED visit for a set of high-volume, ED-relevant conditions, and capture both adult and pediatric patients who may not be captured through MVC’s traditional inpatient/surgery-based episodes of care. The new ED-based episodes (Figure 2) provide MVC members with information on care transitions and trajectory of care for patients visiting the ED, quality improvement opportunities to prevent excess ED visits and inpatient hospitalizations, and patterns in post-ED care (e.g., inpatient admissions, outpatient visits, home health care, skilled nursing facility care, etc.). Ms. Hassett presented unblinded hospital and PO data using ED-based episode payments for CHF patients. Members who are interested in seeing their organization’s ED-based episode data can contact the Coordinating Center to request a report. MVC also shared a link to a video interview of MEDIC Program Director Keith Kocher, MD, MPH, about how sites can utilize MVC’s new ED-based episode structure to improve care for patients treated in the ED as well as how MEDIC supports quality improvement in the ED.

Figure 2.

Following the ED-based episode presentation, Caitlin Valley, Senior Population Health Project Manager with Trinity Health IHA Medical Group, delivered a presentation (see slides) on their strategies and approach to caring for patients across the continuum. She began by providing insights about care transitions and why they are important. She also shared Trinity Health IHA Medical Group’s team-based approach to care transitions (see Figure 3), which includes the use of a transitional support call center and care team navigators for post-discharge follow-up outreach, screening for social influencers of health (SIOH), and comprehensive medication reviews with a clinical pharmacist, among other strategies.

Figure 3.

Ms. Valley also shared several barriers to scheduling hospital follow-up appointments observed by Trinity Health, and the interventions they implemented in response, such as patient education, transportation resources, and creative scheduling solutions. She concluded her presentation by discussing post-acute care collaboration among providers, citing the use of a post-acute transitional care manager and the expertise of partners specializing in the post-acute care space.

Following Ms. Valley’s presentation, a poster session began, providing an opportunity to highlight recent quality improvement successes and encourage networking across the collaborative. The MVC Coordinating Center would like to thank the poster presenters:  Holland Hospital, MSU Health Care, Henry Ford Health System, Michigan Medicine, McLaren Port Huron, MARCQI, BMC2, and the Michigan Cardiac Rehabilitation Network.

Following a networking lunch, attendees participated in one of four breakout sessions: cardiac rehabilitation; post-discharge follow-up for CHF, COPD, and pneumonia; preoperative testing; and sepsis readmissions. In each breakout session, hospital and PO members reviewed unblinded data and shared strategies to address each of the topic areas.

The group reconvened after the breakout sessions for a closing presentation from Michael Sjoding, MD, MSc, Associate Professor of Internal Medicine in Michigan Medicine’s Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Co-Director of the Inspiring Health Advances in Lung Care (INHALE) team, one of the newest population health CQIs in BCBSM’s Value Partnership program. Dr. Sjoding’s presentation (see slides) centered around how INHALE has leveraged MVC data to plan and implement the INHALE collaborative.

The meeting concluded with a summary of the day and upcoming MVC activities, led by MVC Program Manager Erin Conklin, MPA. The slides from Friday’s meeting have been posted to the MVC website. If you have questions about any of the topics discussed at the spring 2023 collaborative-wide meeting or are interested in following up for more detail, contact the Coordinating Center. MVC’s next collaborative-wide meeting will be in person on Friday, October 20, 2023, at the Radisson Hotel at the Capitol in Lansing.

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MVC Kicks of 10-Year Anniversary Celebration at May 19 Meeting

MVC Kicks of 10-Year Anniversary Celebration at May 19 Meeting

The Michigan Value Collaborative premiered several new materials and offerings at this week's Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting, including the kickoff of its 10-year anniversary celebration. Established in 2013 as part of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Value Partnerships Program, MVC was envisioned as a Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI) focused on "helping Michigan hospitals achieve the best possible patient outcomes at the lowest reasonable cost." This interest in improving the value of healthcare has set MVC apart from other CQIs in both its focus and data use. Furthermore, MVC's analytic and engagement efforts resulted in some notable success stories and improvements over the last decade.

To celebrate the ways in which MVC has grown, adapted, and succeeded over time, the Coordinating Center shared a celebratory video (Figure 1) with attendees during its opening presentations on Friday morning. This video included interviews with current and past leadership of MVC who spoke about accomplishments they were most proud of as well as changes and growth they've observed over the years. Some of the highlights included the steady and significant growth in MVC's data sources, observed collaboration and sharing between members, expansion within the Coordinating Center, diversification in MVC's members and partner groups, and MVC's recent certification by CMS as a Qualified Entity. These accomplishments and others were similarly highlighted in a 10-year anniversary timeline poster (Figure 2) and in a slideshow that was played at multiple points throughout the day.

Figure 1. MVC 10-Year Anniversary Celebration Video

Figure 2. MVC 10-Year Anniversary Timeline Poster

The video featured interviews with Director Hari Nathan, MD, PhD; Co-Director Mike Thompson, PhD, MPH; former Director and Senior Advisor Jim Dupree, MD, MPH; former Co-Director and Senior Advisor Scott Regenbogen, MD, MPH; Program Manager Erin Conklin, MPA; and Manager of Data Analytics Chelsea Pizzo, MPH.

MVC will continue to celebrate its 10-year anniversary throughout the remainder of 2023, including at its Fall Collaborative-Wide Meeting. The focus for the latter half of 2023 will be the celebration of case studies and success stories that feature MVC's members, partners, and other stakeholders. MVC looks forward to connecting with individuals to gather those stories in the coming months. If you have a story or quote from your experience partnering with MVC, please share it with the Coordinating Center.

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MVC Honors Mental Health Awareness Month with Workgroup

MVC Honors Mental Health Awareness Month with Workgroup

Mental illness and related conditions such as depression are increasingly prevalent and costly. More than 50% of patients will be diagnosed with mental illness or disorder at some point in their lifetime, according to a World Health Organization research survey, and one in four adolescents will experience depression by the age of 18, contributing to an estimated $406 billion in medical treatment costs in a single year in the U.S. To bring attention and awareness to this issue, the month of May is celebrated nationally as Mental Health Awareness Month. It represents an important opportunity for healthcare providers and hospitals to evaluate the ways in which they currently support patients experiencing mental health/substance use disorder (MH/SUD) conditions.

To help facilitate this conversation, the Michigan Value Collaborative hosted a workgroup yesterday focused on increasing access to high-quality mental health for patients and increasing support for providers. MVC’s guest speakers hail from the Michigan Collaborative Care Implementation Support Team (MCCIST), including Gregory Dalack, MD, MCCIST Co-Lead and Daniel E. Offutt III Professor and Chair of the Michigan Medicine Department of Psychiatry, and Karla Metzger, LMSW, MCCIST Program Manager.

The presenters highlighted the psychiatric Collaborative Care Model (CoCM), an evidence-based integrated behavioral health model that is primary care based and highly cost-effective. Research evidence suggests that up to $6 are saved in long-term healthcare costs for every dollar spent on collaborative care. The presentation included research evidence of the benefits of CoCM, an introduction to its components, tips for implementation and common challenges, and several success stories from both patients and providers.

Those unable to attend Thursday's MVC workgroup can access the full recording on MVC’s YouTube channel. Additionally, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine (APM) jointly developed a report on the CoCM that reviews current evidence, essential elements of implementation, and recommendations for better meeting the health needs of people with mental health conditions, which is available here.

The American Hospital Association has also compiled a variety of resources on its Mental Health Awareness Month webpage related to mental health information, suicide prevention, opioid stewardship, downloadable posters to help employees adopt respectful language, case studies, and other tools and resources.

For those working in the behavioral and mental health space, there is also a recently formed Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI) focused on mental health. Established in 2022, the Michigan Mental Innovation Network and Clinical Design (MI Mind) CQI is a statewide partnership with providers and provider organizations that works to prevent suicide and improve outcomes by reducing suicide attempts and deaths. MI Mind offers access to and engagement in evidence-based services for providers with a focus on suicide prevention, with plans to expand into other behavioral health domains, such as depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders. For a closer look at MI Mind, read MVC’s blog about their formation and check out the MI Mind website.

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MVC Announces Summer Date for New Virtual Rural Health Meeting

MVC Announces Summer Date for New Virtual Rural Health Meeting

MVC will host a special virtual event this summer for its rural and northern Michigan members. The new MVC Rural Health Meeting is modeled after MVC’s collaborative-wide meetings that are offered in person in the spring and fall. This tailored member meeting differs in that its guest speakers and unblinded data presentations will focus on the unique challenges and opportunities in delivering value-based healthcare in rural or low-density communities. The event will take place over Zoom on Wednesday, August 9, 2023, from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

The Collaborative has diversified in recent years with the addition of more rural-based hospitals and physician organizations as well as more representation throughout Northern Michigan, including critical access hospitals. These sites play an integral role in the health system and have a unique care delivery experience.

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), rural providers have higher performance quality measures than their urban counterparts in areas such as safety, community engagement, efficiency, and cost reduction. At the same time, however, they also face unique challenges related to low patient volumes, higher rates of chronic disease, insufficient workforce recruitment and retention, and low reimbursement rates, among others.

It is these unique strengths and challenges that will be the focus of the August 9 agenda, along with unblinded MVC data that caters to priority conditions and areas of care for rural providers. If your hospital or physician organization is interested in presenting on a recent rural health initiative or would like to request data on a specific area of care, please contact the MVC Coordinating Center 

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Latest MVC Push Reports and Resources Draw Attention to Low-Value Preoperative Testing

Latest MVC Push Reports and Resources Draw Attention to Low-Value Preoperative Testing

This week MVC distributed its first of two preoperative testing push reports of 2023, providing members with an opportunity to benchmark their testing practices. MVC first introduced its preoperative testing push reports in 2021 to help members reduce the use of unnecessary testing for surgical procedures. Preoperative testing for low-risk surgeries, especially for young and healthy patients, often provides no clinical benefits yet is ordered regularly at hospitals across Michigan.

The report distributed this week had many similarities to versions distributed last year, namely that members continued to see their rates across a variety of tests for three elective, low-risk procedures performed in outpatient settings: laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, and lumpectomy. Claims were evaluated for the index event as well as 30 days prior to the procedures for the following common tests: electrocardiogram (ECGs), echocardiogram, cardiac stress test, complete blood count, basic metabolic panel, coagulation studies, urinalysis, chest x-ray, and pulmonary function.

The latest report utilizes claims from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and Blue Care Network (BCN) plans exclusively, including both the commercial and Medicare Advantage plans. This allows members to see MVC’s most up-to-date data, which includes episodes with index admissions from 7/1/2020 through 6/30/2022. Members only received reports if they had 11 or more cases in at least one of the three conditions and at least 20 cases across all three conditions.

The reports received by members this week included a patient snapshot table that defined rates for preoperative testing and no preoperative testing in patients of varying races as well as those with zero, one, or two or more comorbidities. Generally speaking, patients with no comorbidities were more likely to have no preoperative testing than patients with one or more comorbidities. There were also observed differences in testing by age; patients who had preoperative testing were older on average than patients who had no preoperative testing.

A key finding in the report is the average testing rate for all three procedures combined for the entire collaborative, which continues to showcase the wide variability across hospitals in Michigan. Some in the collaborative have an average testing rate close to 10% and some nearly 100% (Figure 1). Individual hospitals receiving a report will see on this figure where they fall compared to other hospitals in the collaborative, as well as their average rate for the three separate procedures to help deduce which procedure is driving their average rate.

Figure 1.

Another trend that continued in this April 2023 report is the consistency of average testing rates for combined procedures over time. A trend graph showed members how their overall rate for any preoperative testing compared in 2020, 2021, and the first half of 2022, with data points for their hospital, the MVC average, and their regional comparison group (Figure 2). There continues to be very little change in testing rates over time when looking at aggregated preoperative testing practices. The prevalence of low-value preoperative testing has remained high on average across the collaborative for three years and likely longer.

Figure 2.

A third figure included in this report shows the absolute change in the rate of any preoperative testing for their hospital’s highest volume surgical condition among laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, and lumpectomy (Figure 3). In this figure, positive values represent an increase in annual preoperative testing from 7/1/2020 to 6/30/2022, and negative values represent a decrease. The MVC average for this metric was -2.3%, so there was a small net decrease in the average rate of any testing in that time period. Once again, the variation across the collaborative was notable, with some hospitals seeing greater than 40% swings in either direction – though some sites may see drastic changes to their rates if case counts are smaller.

Figure 3.

The remaining figures in the report provide preoperative testing rates for specific types of tests, with caterpillar plots for each condition to help benchmark performance to other hospitals across the state. The types of tests with the highest average testing rates across conditions are blood tests—which include complete blood count, basic metabolic panel, and coagulation tests—and electrocardiography tests. For a majority of hospitals, their testing rates are highest within the lumpectomy patient population regardless of test type, with the exception of urinalysis testing rates that are heavily driven by the cholecystectomy population.

The last time MVC shared preoperative testing reports was in July 2022, and since then MVC contributed to and launched resources to help healthcare providers implement changes. MVC members now have access to a sample preoperative testing decision aid for low-risk surgeries, developed in partnership with the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (MSQC) and the Michigan Program on Value Enhancement (MPrOVE), and MVC (Figure 4). The decision aid also comes with a supplemental suggested preoperative testing chart that identifies which tests are recommended for patients who are classified by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) as Class III or above and undergoing low-risk surgery (Figure 5). Both resources are intended as guides and can be downloaded in their original file formats so hospitals may edit and adapt them within their institution. These resources were developed with input from one institution’s surgery, anesthesiology, and preoperative clinic teams, and based on clinical recommendations put forth by a number of professional societies.

Figure 4.

Figure 5.

These resources were added to a new resource website developed in partnership with MPrOVE, MSQC, and MVC. The goal of the site is to help providers safely “waive the workup” by providing the latest research, national recommendations, arguments against common myths, and frequently asked questions.

In addition, the MVC team is holding several workgroups in 2023 dedicated to preoperative testing. The first took place on March 15 and was heavily attended by MSQC and MVC members working to reduce preoperative testing as part of their P4P programs. A full recording of the workgroup is available here. MVC also has a preoperative testing workgroup scheduled for August 1, from 1-2 p.m., featuring guest presenter Nick Berlin, MD, MPH, MS, who has published several papers on patterns and determinants of low-value preoperative testing. A third preoperative testing workgroup is tentatively scheduled for October 26, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sites are encouraged to attend these events in order to learn best practices and collaborate with peers on common barriers.

For additional analysis or consultation on your hospital’s preoperative testing rates or practices, reach out to the MVC team for assistance at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.

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MVC Evaluates Impact of MOQC Antiemetic Initiative on Healthcare Utilization During Chemotherapy

MVC Evaluates Impact of MOQC Antiemetic Initiative on Healthcare Utilization During Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV) is among the most feared side effects of chemotherapy among cancer patients. It impairs the patient's quality of life and also adds to the morbidity and cost of therapy. That is why the Michigan Oncology Quality Consortium (MOQC)—a physician-led, voluntary collaborative of medical and gynecologic oncologists who work to improve the quality and value of cancer care in Michigan—initiated its Antiemetic Initiative. Through this initiative, MOQC supports participating oncology practices in aligning with current guidelines for use of prophylactic antiemetics, including olanzapine, in patients receiving chemotherapy. The Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) recently partnered with MOQC to evaluate the impact of this initiative and estimated a cost savings of $334,095 across the course of chemotherapy from the increased use of olanzapine and decreased inpatient admissions in this cohort of patients.

Olanzapine is underused in patients receiving high-emetic-risk chemotherapy, despite evidence of efficacy and good patient tolerance (Navari et al., 2016). Olanzapine is a long-used medication (originally in higher doses for the treatment of psychosis) that is highly effective at decreasing nausea and vomiting. Uptake of olanzapine has been low, however, in part due to oncologists' lack of familiarity with the medication, lack of awareness or agreement with the guidelines, and lack of olanzapine inclusion on prepopulated order sets. The current labeling of olanzapine as an antipsychotic poses an additional barrier since this labeling generates additional concerns about stigma and side effects among patients. A benefit to this medication, in addition to its effect on nausea and vomiting, is its low cost compared with other medicines used to prevent the side effects of chemotherapy; the cost for each pill is about 25 cents.

Practices participating in MOQC’s Antiemetic Initiative receive performance data and baseline assessments in the area of CINV guideline adherence, support in identifying gaps in care and quality improvement measures, and resources for provider and patient education. To help evaluate the impact of this work on guideline-concordant olanzapine use, MOQC first reached out to MVC in 2022 to leverage its robust claims-based data. MOQC hypothesized that patients treated in medical oncology practices with low rates of olanzapine prescribing would have higher rates of healthcare utilization, including hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, and unplanned outpatient visits between treatment cycles. The goal of this analysis was to estimate the initiative's overall impact on healthcare utilization for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy as well as any related cost savings that improved the value of care delivery.

Methodology

The cohort for this analysis was comprised of female patients with a 90-day claims-based MVC episode of care for lumpectomy or mastectomy in 2016-2021 who received combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as either neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. The cohort included patients covered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) PPO Commercial, BCBSM PPO Medicare Advantage (MA), Blue Care Network (BCN) HMO Commercial, BCN HMO MA, and Medicare Fee-For-Service. The resulting MVC analysis included episodes for 1,891 patients who had a breast cancer resection, received both chemotherapy drugs on the same day, and were attributed to a MOQC provider/practice. Patients were attributed to 45 of MOQC's participating practices.

Practice-level olanzapine data collected by MOQC was then used to assess whether each patient's first chemotherapy receipt was during a time when their attributed practice had high or low prescribing rates of olanzapine. The threshold for high versus low prescribing at a particular practice was set at a 25% prescribing rate. Once a practice reached 25% prescribing rates of olanzapine in MOQC's data, that practice was considered to have "high" olanzapine prescribing rates in all subsequent months for this analysis. Using that distinction of whether the practice was a high or low prescriber during the course of the patient's chemotherapy regimen, MVC compared post-chemotherapy healthcare utilization among patients treated by high- versus low-prescriber practices. Sub-analyses further restricted the cohort to patients attributed to a practice that ever became categorized as having high olanzapine prescribing rates. When limiting the analysis to practices that became high prescribers at any point, the cohort was narrowed down to patients attributed to 15 MOQC practices.

Limitations

The nature of claims data limited MVC's ability to identify patients attributed to participating oncologists at MOQC practices; the requirement of each patient in the cohort having a MOQC provider NPI on one of their claims reduced the analytic cohort to a smaller size than what would be seen in clinical data. Another limitation is that the findings may include period effects not controlled for in this analysis. Practice behavior and availability of inpatient beds may have differed between when a practice was a low olanzapine prescriber compared to when they began prescribing olanzapine at a higher rate. Finally, payment calculations included in this analysis are limited to dollars saved among the attributed claims-based population and, therefore, do not reflect savings that may be attributed to olanzapine use among the broader population of interest.

Impact & Next Steps

A key finding in the analysis included a significant difference in healthcare utilization across the course of chemotherapy among patients treated by high olanzapine prescribing MOQC practices compared to when they had low olanzapine utilization. Among the patients with cancer who received their first cycle of chemotherapy when their provider's practice had a high prescribing rate (≥25%), 10% were hospitalized (Figure 1). This inpatient admission rate was significantly lower than for those patients undergoing chemotherapy regimens at practices with low olanzapine prescribing rates, 15% of whom were hospitalized (p=0.02). This finding was based on a subset of patients attributed to practices who eventually became high olanzapine prescribers during the study period (922 patients at 15 practices).

Figure 1. Rates of Inpatient Admission Across Patients' Course of Chemotherapy, by Practice's Utilization Rate of Antiemetics at the Start of Chemotherapy (N=922)

This analysis further discovered a significant difference in the percentage of patients who had either an ED visit or inpatient admission. Of the patients receiving chemotherapy at MOQC practices, fewer patients at high-prescribing practices had either an ED visit or inpatient admission (19%) across the course of their treatment compared to patients receiving care at low-prescribing practices (26%).

MVC estimated a cost savings of $334,095 across the course of chemotherapy from the increased use of olanzapine and decreased inpatient admissions in this cohort of patients. Dollars saved were calculated by taking the number of patients whose chemotherapy began when their practice was a high prescriber (525), multiplied by the difference in the percentage of patients with an inpatient admission across the course of chemotherapy attributed to practice antiemetic prescribing rate (5.3%), multiplied by the average price-standardized payment for an inpatient admission during a 90-day episode of care among breast cancer resection episodes for the included payers ($12,007).

This analysis demonstrated further evidence that the use of prophylactic olanzapine is an effective strategy for managing CINV-related ED visits or hospitalizations. It furthermore identified tangible CQI impact in the form of patients who underwent breast cancer treatment being less likely to visit the ED or be hospitalized over the course of their chemotherapy regimen, as well as in the form of dollars saved on facility inpatient costs across the course of chemotherapy. Ongoing work will continue to support practices to make changes in the use of olanzapine, not only in patients receiving combination therapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide but also in other high-emetic-risk regimens.

MVC’s expertise and data frequently result in partner projects like this; MVC completed a number of CQI impact assessments last year, as well as several more so far in 2023. MVC also participates in collaborative activities with peer CQIs through new condition and report development, data analysis and metric consultation, and data matching exercises that pair clinical and claims-based data. To request a copy of any of MVC’s completed CQI impact assessments, please contact the MVC Coordinating Center.

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MVC Announces Speakers, Breakout Sessions for Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting

MVC Announces Speakers, Breakout Sessions for Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting

The MVC Coordinating Center is excited to announce the agenda for its Spring Collaborative-Wide Meeting on Friday, May 19, 2023, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., at the Vistatech Center in Livonia, MI. This meeting’s theme of “connecting the dots” reflects a focus on interdisciplinary collaboration, care transitions, and alternative sites of care. This meeting also serves as the official launch of MVC’s 10-year anniversary celebration, which will highlight MVC’s achievements in promoting high-value healthcare throughout the last decade.

Presentations will highlight unblinded MVC data, inter-organizational partnerships, care team collaboration to improve patient outcomes, and supporting care transitions. Attendees will learn to utilize MVC’s claims data more effectively and efficiently to inform patient-centered quality improvement opportunities at their respective healthcare organizations. After this meeting, attendees will have insights and tools to help improve the following patient outcomes: care transitions and post-discharge support, readmissions, patient experience, treatment adherence, and patient education.

MVC’s Director Hari Nathan, MD, PhD, and Co-Director Mike Thompson, PhD, MPH, will kick off the day with Coordinating Center updates, announcements about the MVC Component of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program, and success stories that celebrate MVC’s 10-year anniversary. This will be followed by the unveiling of new MVC episodes based on care initiated in the emergency department (ED), which were developed in partnership with the Michigan Emergency Department Improvement Collaborative (MEDIC). This presentation will include an unblinded data presentation using new ED-based episodes for congestive heart failure (CHF) patients.

The guest presentations will feature two MVC partners, a physician organization and a fellow Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI). Speaking in the morning will be the Trinity Health IHA Medical Group. Caitlin Valley, MHA, Senior Population Health Project Manager at IHA, will present on transitional care collaboration and management for healthcare improvement. In the afternoon, attendees will hear from the INHALE (Inspiring Health Advances in Lung Care) team, a new population health CQI focused on the quality of care for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and adults and children with asthma. Speaking about COPD care transitions and post-discharge support on behalf of INHALE will be Co-Director Michael Sjoding, MD, MSc, who is also an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at Michigan Medicine.

In addition to traditional presentations, attendees will have multiple opportunities to network with and learn from their peers. The meeting includes a mid-day poster session that will highlight success stories and research across the collaborative and the broader CQI portfolio. MVC is still actively accepting poster submissions. Posters should feature first-hand experiences with quality improvement, related research, or the implementation of interventions and best practices. They can be on topics unrelated to MVC conditions or data, authored by clinicians and non-clinicians alike, or presentations already shared at a recent conference or event. Instructions for submitting a poster are available on MVC’s events page.

There will also be breakout sessions in the afternoon that focus on the new value metrics for Program Years 2024-2025 of the MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program. Attendees were asked to select one of four breakout sessions upon registering, including cardiac rehabilitation, post-discharge follow-up (focus on CHF, COPD, pneumonia), preoperative testing, and sepsis readmissions. MVC members interested in referencing the value metrics selected by specific hospitals participating in P4P can refer to MVC's value metric selection document located here.

Those interested in attending MVC's spring collaborative-wide meeting may register here. MVC hosts two collaborative-wide meetings each year to bring together healthcare quality leaders and clinicians from across the state. The fall collaborative-wide meeting will take place in October with a focus on health equity.

CME CREDITS AVAILABLE

The University of Michigan Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Michigan Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Activity Planners

Hari Nathan, MD, PhD; Erin Conklin, MPA; Chelsea Pizzo, MPH; Chelsea Andrews, MPH; Kristy Degener, MPH

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MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program: PY22 in Review

MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program: PY22 in Review

Last month the Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) distributed final scorecards for Program Year (PY) 2022 of the MVC Component of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program. PY 2022 was the first year of a two-year cycle for which MVC data was used to evaluate hospitals on two of seven selected episode spending conditions. These P4P condition options included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), colectomy, congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), joint replacement, pneumonia, and spine surgery. Figure one shows the frequency of hospital condition selections for this two-year program cycle. Joint replacement was the most commonly selected condition, while colectomy was selected by the fewest hospitals.

Figure 1. Distribution of Hospital Condition Selections for PY 2022

The MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program evaluates each participating hospital’s average 30-day, risk-adjusted, price-standardized episode payments for their two selected conditions through two methods. One way that hospitals earn points is by reducing their payments from the baseline period (which included index admissions in 2019) to the performance period (which included index admissions in 2021). These are termed “improvement points.” Alternatively, hospitals can earn points by being less expensive than the other hospitals in their cohort. These are referred to as “achievement points.” The MVC cohorts are groups of hospitals determined to be peers using bed size and case mix index.

While participants are scored on both improvement and achievement, members receive the higher of the two scores for each condition. Hospitals were also eligible to receive a bonus point for each condition by completing a questionnaire designed to inform MVC of member hospital quality improvement practices. While 12 points were available, a maximum of 10 points were awarded to participating members. Figure 2 shows the distribution of total points earned by hospitals for PY 2022.

Figure 2. Distribution of Total P4P Scores for PY 2022

On average, hospitals earned 7.7 points total, a nearly one-point increase from the average of 6.8 points in PY 2021. A majority (98.7%) of hospitals earned at least one of the two possible participation bonus points. The condition with the highest average point total was joint replacement at 4.6 points with spine coming in second at 3.4 points (Figure 3).

Figure 3. Average Points by Condition

If you have any questions regarding the MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program, please reference the P4P Technical Document for Program Years 2022 and 2023 and the MVC P4P FAQ PY 2022-2023. If you would like to set up a meeting to review your hospital’s scorecard, please contact the MVC Coordinating Center at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.  MVC plans to evaluate and release mid-year scorecards for PY 2023 in the summer of 2023.

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MVC Service Day Highlights the Impact of Food Bank Partnerships on Healthcare Outcomes

MVC Service Day Highlights the Impact of Food Bank Partnerships on Healthcare Outcomes

MVC staff stepped out of their daily routines recently when they volunteered as a team at a local nonprofit organization. Eager to make this service opportunity as meaningful to their work as possible, MVC staff selected an organization with ties to health and well-being. Last month they were hosted by Food Gatherers, the food bank and food rescue program serving Michigan residents in Washtenaw County. MVC teammates worked together to sort rescued produce in the Food Gatherers warehouse, saving and packing 1,312 pounds of produce for the community.

Though MVC teammates were excited and impressed by that number, it pales in comparison to the amount of food processed by food banks like Food Gatherers, which last year distributed 7.3 million pounds of food — the equivalent of 6 million meals — through its network of partner programs. In order to collect and distribute all those meals, Food Gatherers maintains a working warehouse where an average of nine tons of food are processed each day, and a busy community kitchen prepares and serves hot meals seven days a week. Volunteers play a significant role in these operations.

Produce boxes and other foods that are processed by volunteers eventually find their way into the hands of over 170 community partners, such as food pantries or emergency groceries. In addition to distributing food, Food Gatherers also works to connect beneficiaries to SNAP and other federal food programs and provide innovative food distribution initiatives at area schools and clinics. A new area of focus is the cultivation of partnerships with healthcare providers to further identify and address food insecurity in the community.

Food Gatherers established its Health Care and Food Bank Partnership Initiative to create a connection between local healthcare institutions and Food Gatherers’ network of partner pantries. It was designed to increase access to food for community members in partnership with healthcare providers. Key activities of the initiative include establishing food insecurity screening and referral programs within primary care locations, training medical professionals such as residents and allied health professionals on the role of food security as a key social determinant of health, and drawing attention to the issue of hunger and healthy food access with healthcare providers.

This is a growing area of interest for food banks across the country since food insecurity is closely linked to poor health outcomes and increased risk of chronic disease. According to one study, in fact, the rate of Type 2 diabetes is 25% higher in adults who are food insecure. In addition, as many as one-third of patients with a chronic illness are unable to afford food, medications, or both. A recent publication using MVC data also found strong associations between chronic disease burden and financial outcomes.

Several components of the Food Gatherers Health Care and Food Bank Partnership Initiative were initially supported through a Michigan Medicine grant. Food Gatherers has worked with Michigan Medicine, Trinity Health St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor, and IHA as well as with community-based clinics such as the Hope Clinic, Packard Health, and the Corner Health Center. Though the grant ended in 2021, the larger concept of partnership between healthcare providers and community food banks is still an area of interest and opportunity.

"Food Gatherers has been working with our local health care partners to support and encourage the use of food insecurity screening in primary care settings,” said Markell Miller, MPH, Director of Community Food Programs at Food Gatherers. “When providers can identify food insecurity in a patient, they can help connect the individual to resources - specifically SNAP, or if it's an urgent need, a local food pantry. Hunger is a health issue, and when providers talk about food security, they reinforce the connection between nutrition and health, and also destigmatize the experience for individuals facing food insecurity. Our Hunger and Health Training program provides baseline information for physicians on food security as a social determinant of health, and how to support individuals facing food insecurity. We've focused on training medical residents going into careers in primary care, but there is an opportunity to train other providers to increase knowledge and comfort with food insecurity screening and referrals. We look forward to future opportunities to expand our partnership with health care providers, and also continue to seek sustainable funding solutions to support the network of healthy pantries that are available in our community."

Similar programs are also underway at other food banks across Michigan, such as Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan. In 2015, Gleaners was one of three participating food banks in a two-year randomized controlled research study on the impact of food bank interventions on outcomes for patients with Type 2 diabetes. They have partnerships with the CHASS Center, Covenant Community Care, Henry Ford Health System, the Michigan Health Endowment Fund, the National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, and Trinity Health St. Joseph Mercy Livingston, and have thus far connected more than 500 patients with healthy food.

MVC recently invited Jessica Ramsay, MPH, Director of Wellness and Nutrition Education at Gleaners, to present at MVC’s upcoming chronic disease management workgroup on Thurs., April 20, from 2 - 3 p.m. The presentation will focus on partnerships between healthcare providers and community organizations, highlighting pilot programs and initiatives at Gleaners that improved both patient outcomes and healthcare utilization through reduced food insecurity. Registration for this workgroup presentation is open now.

To learn more about the food banks mentioned, please visit the websites of Food Gatherers and Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeastern Michigan. Reach out to MVC if your hospital or PO has a similar partnership in place with a community-based organization – MVC would love to highlight this work.

To learn more about the ways in which food insecurity impacts health, check out the video below from Feeding America.

Illuminating Intersections: Hunger and Health (Feeding America)

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MVC Welcomes New Analyst, Julia Mantey, MPH, MUP

MVC Welcomes New Analyst, Julia Mantey, MPH, MUP

I am happy to introduce myself as a new senior analyst with the Michigan Value Collaborative. I’m excited to apply my experience as an epidemiologist and statistician to support the collaborative’s mission to improve Michiganders’ health. I look forward to working with the MVC team, getting to know our members, and developing new skills.

I’ve worked in health research since graduating from the University of Michigan School of Public Health with my Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in 2015. I participated in a dual-degree program, earning a Master of Urban Planning (MUP) degree in tandem with my MPH. I believe that our built environment has a tremendous influence on communities, habits, and opportunities – all of which impact individual and public health. While completing my studies I was drawn to data management and visualization, and I pursued related roles upon graduation. Most recently, I worked as a statistician on grant-funded studies of pathogen transmission within nursing homes with the Center for Research and Innovations in Special Populations (CRIISP), a Michigan Medicine research team.

While I’ve found my professional niche working with health-related data, I also apply my background in urban planning as a Planning Commissioner in my hometown of Farmington. Outside of work, I enjoy running with my dog, gardening in the summer, and baking in the winter. If you have any questions for me, please reach out to jmantey@med.umich.edu.