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Continuous Glucose Monitoring Has Potential in Inpatient Setting

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Has Potential in Inpatient Setting

One of the most prevalent comorbidities in the United States is diabetes; as many as 1 in 10 Americans are diagnosed with this condition, and 90-95% having potentially preventable Type 2 diabetes. It is well documented that unstable blood glucose levels can contribute to increases in morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

In the inpatient setting, the current standard of care for monitoring and testing blood glucose levels in diabetic patients is point-of-care (POC) testing, which combines a specific testing schedule and approved devices to measure blood glucose levels. A recent study involving 110 adults with Type 2 diabetes looked at implementing real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) in order to better manage inpatient glycemic levels. The patients were on a non-intensive care unit (ICU) floor, and received either the standard of care or the RT-CGM with Dexcom G6 monitoring—where a tiny sensor wire is inserted just beneath a person’s skin using an automatic applicator. Data was transmitted from the bedside wirelessly, and monitored by hospital telemetry. The bedside nurses were notified of any abnormal glucose levels or trends and the patients were treated accordingly. The results indicated that patients in the RT-CGM group demonstrated lower mean glucose levels and less time in hyperglycemia.

Another study that evaluated the efficacy of RT-CGM discussed the effect that uncontrolled glycemic levels can have on clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. Currently, hospitals use POC glucose testing in order to monitor and treat hypoglycemia, and it is recommended that POC testing occur four to six times per day. However, this leaves many hours throughout the day where hypoglycemia can go undetected. RT-CGM using a glucose telemetry system (GTS) offers an alternative method to monitor these glucose values. A total of 82 patients participated in this study. Patients in the RT-CGM group experienced 60.4% fewer hypoglycemic events compared to the POC group. Figure 1 below illustrates the number of hypoglycemic events per patient for both the CGM/GTS and the POC.

Figure 1.

RT-CGM has yet to be implemented in inpatient settings for several reasons. The primary reason is the lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Additionally, institutional challenges may act as a significant barrier. For instance, staff need to be prepared for increased workload and educated on appropriate protocols and procedures. Technological support is required to ensure hardware compatibility and maintain a robust internet network with minimal interference in transmission of results and alerts. Additional factors within the hospital setting include certain medications, procedures, nutrition, acute illness, and any other condition that may affect glucose control. All of these challenges have the potential to impact CGM and its associated workload because of the effect they may have on the patients’ blood glucose levels. Although challenges remain to the implementation of RT-CGM in the inpatient setting, the benefits may outweigh the risks; thus, it is worth considering, especially given the successes in the outpatient arena.

The Michigan Value Collaborative hosts diabetes workgroups where topics such as continuous glucose monitoring are discussed by Collaborative members. If you are interested in attending the next MVC diabetes workgroup, please connect with the MVC Coordinating Center at: michiganvaluecollaborative@gmail.com.

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Monitoring Chronic Disease Utilizing Social Media and Sensors

Monitoring Chronic Disease Utilizing Social Media and Sensors

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “treating individuals with chronic diseases accounts for 86% of health care costs.” While the number of those living with chronic conditions and the associated costs may be increasing, the Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) is committed to providing you with current data around providing the right care, at the right time, at the right cost. Technological advances in healthcare are changing how and where chronic disease care is being delivered, how these patients interact with providers, and how organizations exchange information.

Both diabetes and abnormal blood pressure (BP) are extremely common in chronic disease patients and cause various complications, including an increased risk of cardiovascular events. When thinking about the way in which these chronic diseases should be managed moving forward after the COVID-19 pandemic, technological advances offer promising solutions.  Most devices in the healthcare industry have been digitalized. This advancement allows for routine monitoring using various devices that some patients may already own, such as a smart phone or a smart watch. These devices contain sensors that can be used to obtain information that can then be transmitted straight into the electronic health record (EHR). Other devices that can be used to collect patient information include a glucometer sensor, pulse oximeters, temperature sensors, scales, and many more. However, this method is not without its limitations.

The amount of data that is generated from these devices is vast and not all systems are capable of storing and processing it efficiently for precise and real time monitoring. In order to negate this issue, a framework was recently published that can be seen in Figure 1 below. This framework utilizes the cloud environment along with a large analytics engine layer to help store and process the data. The recently published study identifies the importance of utilizing wearable sensors and social networking platforms in collecting patient data, but identifies the challenges that come with this such as issues with data storage and running correct analyses.

Figure 1. Layers in the proposed healthcare monitoring framework

Chronic disease management patients may use social media platforms in order to seek support or learn new ways in which they may be able to reverse certain symptoms. Other ways in which monitoring is done through social networks include patient and provider conversations through application programming interfaces (APIs). Through these APIs, providers can pick up on tone or social connection status. Through this proposed framework of social media and sensor monitoring, providers can closely monitor chronic disease management patients.

MVC hosts chronic disease management workgroups where collaborative members discuss their current initiatives and connect on ways in which they can work together to better the health of Michigan. If you have any questions about upcoming chronic disease management workgroups, please feel free to contact the coordinating center at michiganvaluecollaborative@gmail.com