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MVC and MHA Keystone Center Partner to Develop New Statewide Childbirth Outcomes Report

MVC and MHA Keystone Center Partner to Develop New Statewide Childbirth Outcomes Report

The birth of a child is a life-changing experience and a significant clinical event, with those experiencing pregnancy and childbirth hoping for a positive experience and healthy outcome. Yet the maternal mortality rate in the United States was 23.8 per 100,000 live births in 2020, and four in five pregnancy-related deaths were preventable according to the CDC. One in four of these deaths occur on the day of delivery or within one week, with considerable evidence that negative outcomes are more likely for patients of color. These findings are evidence of the need for quality improvement initiatives that ensure all people who are pregnant or postpartum receive the care they need. In light of this, the Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) recently collaborated with the Michigan Health and Hospital Association (MHA) Keystone Center on the development of a statewide report on birth outcomes.

MVC claims data comprise approximately 84% of Michigan's insured population; these data are processed into 30- and 90-day price-standardized and risk-adjusted episodes of care that allow MVC to identify practice variation and measure the value of care. MVC creates episodes for over 40 medical and surgical conditions, including vaginal and cesarean childbirth delivery. MVC used a subset of claims from its data on Michigan childbirth episodes to create this new statewide report. The goal was to highlight statewide disparities in care and support the MHA Keystone Center and the Michigan Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (MI AIM) in their efforts to increase equitable care and decrease preventable severe maternal morbidity and mortality in Michigan.

MVC’s new statewide childbirth episodes report provides information on total episode payments, mode of delivery, patient characteristics, and rates of certain birth-related complications using 90-day episodes of care for vaginal and cesarean delivery. Measures in this report are based exclusively on Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) PPO Commercial episodes for childbirth index admissions that occurred at MVC-participating hospitals between 1/1/19 and 12/31/21. Hospitals in this report were unidentified and each was required to have a minimum of 20 childbirth episodes across the reporting period to be included. Similarly to other MVC reports, several metrics were displayed by the index hospital’s geographic region of Michigan as categorized by MVC (see MVC regions here), with others stratified by race or mode of delivery.

The analysis found an average price-standardized, risk-adjusted 90-day total episode payment of $7,765 for vaginal delivery and $10,264 for cesarean delivery (Figure 1), with average index lengths of stay of 3.1 and 4.0 days, respectively. Additionally, the overall rate of cesarean delivery was 32.3% in July-Dec. of 2021, a slight increase compared to cesarean rates in 2019 and 2020 (Figure 2).

Figure 1. Average Price-Standardized and Risk-Adjusted 90-Day Total Episode Payments by Mode of Delivery, Overall and by Hospital

Figure 2. Rates of Cesarean Delivery, 2019 Through 2021, Overall and by Region of Michigan

Overall, 7.5% of patients had a diagnosis of hemorrhage, 4.2% had a diagnosis of hypertension, and 1.8% had a diagnosis of severe maternal morbidity (SMM) during their index birth hospitalization. A notable finding was the difference in rates of these complications by race (Figure 3). Patients who were identified as Asian or Pacific Islander had higher rates of hemorrhage than other race categories, and patients who were identified as Black had higher rates of hypertension and SMM than the overall population. This is consistent with other research findings related to disparate health outcomes for non-white patients.

Figure 3. Rates of Hypertension, Hemorrhage, and Severe Maternal Morbidity (SMM), Overall and by Race

Health disparities such as these are an area of focus within the MVC Coordinating Center’s broader strategic framework. MVC’s health equity sub-committee meets regularly to strategize how to emphasize equity among its membership and support related quality improvement initiatives. The Coordinating Center’s aim is to use MVC data to help members identify areas of opportunity and support quality improvement through collaboration with peers. To this end, MVC is currently developing a hospital-level adaptation of the new statewide birth outcomes report to share site-specific data with its members later this year.

“Claims data such as those included in MVC’s episodes of care present a great opportunity to use state-wide data to highlight important findings and disparities related to birth outcomes in Michigan,” said Kristen Hassett, the lead MVC analyst for the analysis. “This report represents an important step in MVC’s work to identify areas of health inequality and then support initiatives to reduce those disparities.”

For the MHA Keystone Center, the statewide report provides valuable data to further inform its work.

“We are proud to partner with organizations like the Michigan Value Collaborative to collect and examine critical data related to childbirth within Michigan health systems,” said Sarah Scranton, vice president of safety and quality at MHA and executive director of MHA Keystone Center. “By evaluating hemorrhage, hypertension and severe maternal morbidity rates across several regions of the state, we are able to address the challenges facing Michigan mothers and birthing centers.”

The MVC statewide childbirth episodes report will aid MHA’s field engagement team while they engage with hospitals not yet partnering with MI AIM. Since its adoption in Michigan in 2016, MI AIM has contributed to significant improvement in hemorrhage-related SMM, hypertension-related SMM, and overall SMM through the implementation of hemorrhage, hypertension, and sepsis patient safety bundles with Michigan birthing hospitals.

To view the complete report, visit the MVC website. The Coordinating Center welcomes any additional questions about the report findings or any custom report analyses inspired by its creation. Contact the MVC team at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.

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MVC Workgroup Planned to Support Members Focused on Cardiac Rehabilitation Rates

MVC Workgroup Planned to Support Members Focused on Cardiac Rehabilitation Rates

Next week marks the kickoff of American Heart Month, commemorating the more than 600,000 Americans who die from heart disease each year and raising awareness about strategies that support heart health. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is one of those critical strategies, with the second full week of February each year dedicated to promoting its role in reducing the harmful effects of heart disease. In support of efforts to promote this life-saving program, MVC will host a CR-focused workgroup on Feb. 16, from 2-3 p.m., with MVC Co-Director Mike Thompson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Cardiac Surgery at Michigan Medicine, as its guest speaker. He will highlight some recent efforts to increase patient enrollment.

This is the third time MVC has hosted a workgroup dedicated to CR utilization; the first took place during last year’s CR week in February 2022 and featured guest presenters Steven Keteyian, Ph.D., Director of Preventive Cardiology at Henry Ford Medical Group, and Greg Merritt, Ph.D., patient advocate, in a discussion about strategies for increasing CR use. The second in November 2022 featured Diane Hamilton, BAA, CEP, of Corewell Health Trenton Hospital, who discussed addressing transportation barriers as an obstacle to CR attendance.

CR is a medically supervised program encompassing exercise, education, peer support, and counseling to help patients recovering from a cardiac event, disease, or procedure. There is high-quality evidence that it saves lives and money. A 2016 meta-analysis estimated that for every 37 coronary heart disease patients who attended CR, one of their lives was saved on average. Additionally, the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium (BMC2) and the Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) came together recently to measure the impact attributed to CR for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients treated between 2015 and 2019, and estimated 86 lives saved, 145 readmissions avoided, and approximately $1.8 million in savings.

Despite the evidence in favor of its clinical impact and cost-effectiveness, CR remains heavily underutilized, with only one in three eligible Michiganders participating. MVC’s hospital-level cardiac rehab reports showcase similar findings (Figure 1). These reports were rebranded recently under the new Michigan Cardiac Rehabilitation Network (MiCR) umbrella in partnership with BMC2. They measure whether and when patients started CR at MVC hospitals and how long they kept going. The collaborative-wide average for PCI patients, for example, was 38.3%, with hospital rates ranging from approximately 10%-60%. Such a wide range in patient participation rates suggests MVC member hospitals would benefit from the insights of top-performing peers.

Figure 1.

MVC is pursuing several strategies to address this critical gap in utilization. The upcoming Feb. 16 workgroup will be one of several CR-focused workgroups offered throughout 2023. The Coordinating Center decided to offer workgroups on this topic in part because of its recent incorporation of a CR measure into the MVC Component of the BCBSM Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program. MVC member hospitals were recently asked to make metric selections for the upcoming Program Year 2024-2025 cycle, and as of February 2023 just over one quarter of hospitals elected to be scored on their CR rates for the new value metric component of the MVC measure. These hospitals will receive more P4P points if their CR utilization rate improves over time or is greater relative to their peers. These hospitals are currently treating the patients who will make up their performance year data for Program Year 2024 of the MVC measure. Therefore, MVC aims to offer tailored workgroups to support those sites being scored on CR utilization, most likely incorporating some unblinded data presentations and highlighting key resources and practices for quality improvement purposes.

The MVC team hopes these efforts to facilitate peer learning within the collaborative will help hospitals across the state improve CR participation. Doing so would save the lives of patients and improve the value of healthcare in Michigan. Sites that selected CR as their value metric component of the MVC P4P measure are encouraged to attend; however, anyone interested in this area of healthcare is welcome. Those interested in attending may register here. Please contact the MVC Coordinating Center with any questions at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.

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Healthy Weight Awareness Month Inspires Workgroup Collaboration

Healthy Weight Awareness Month Inspires Workgroup Collaboration

This January, healthcare organizations and advocacy groups across the country are promoting Healthy Weight Awareness Month, as well as innovations in weight loss procedures. In alignment with this national conversation, MVC recently hosted its first workgroup of 2023 with a guest presentation by Oliver Varban, MD, FACS, FASMBS, Associate Director at the Michigan Bariatric Surgery Collaborative (MBSC), about obesity in Michigan, the main challenges of treatment, and how MBSC uses data to improve surgical management outcomes. The aim of such workgroups is to impart relevant data, best practices, and success stories for the benefit of MVC members and partners working in that clinical area.

According to data from CDC, the prevalence of obesity increased from 30% to 42% over the past 20 years, with 41% of Americans currently considered clinically obese. Excess body weight is associated with many different conditions and comorbidities (e.g., certain types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and stroke) and is a risk factor for increased severity and fatality of various conditions, such as those who experienced more severe illness from COVID-19 infection. Clinical management interventions range from screening and lifestyle changes to medication and surgery.

Identification and treatment of obesity often begins by measuring a patient’s body mass index (BMI), an estimate of body fat based on height and weight. The CDC uses BMI to measure obesity, but this measure falls short in several ways. For one, the accuracy of the measurement is lower among men, the elderly, and those in the intermediate BMI ranges. In addition, racial groups experience differing levels of disease for a given BMI. On its own BMI is not an accurate predictor of health. There are also a number of complex connections to social determinants of health since patients residing in environments with more limited access to healthy food and physical activity often have higher BMIs.

MBSC has been working to support quality improvement in healthy weight management since 2005 and aims to innovate the science and practice of metabolic and bariatric surgery through comprehensive, lifelong, patient-centered obesity care. MBSC utilizes its extensive clinical registry data to generate tools that support clinicians and patients in decision-making, including several patient- and provider-facing tools that outline a patient’s likely risks, benefits, and costs for various treatment pathways.

Given obesity’s prevalence and association with other chronic conditions, improved outcomes for patients managing obesity have far-reaching implications. Therefore, MVC and MBSC partnered last year to measure the value of bariatric surgery in treating diabetes, one of the most common and costly chronic conditions. According to the American Diabetes Association, $1 in $7 healthcare dollars are spent treating diabetes and its complications, and patients diagnosed with diabetes face 2.3 times the average person's healthcare costs. The analysis performed by MVC and MBSC was largely driven by existing evidence in the literature that bariatric surgery resolved or improved Type 2 diabetes symptoms in a large proportion of patients (Varban et al., 2022). Using its rich administrative claims data sources, MVC helped analyze pre-surgery and post-surgery receipt of diabetes medications, which was used to estimate the overall impact across Michigan and its estimated cost savings due to a decrease in post-surgery diabetes medication prescription fills.

The most impressive finding of the analysis was a significant decrease in the percentage of bariatric surgery patients who filled any diabetes prescription post-surgery (Figure 1), with over 50% of patients who previously used diabetes prescriptions taking no medications within 120 days post-surgery. This amounted to an annual cost savings of about $4,133 per patient. Five years post-surgery, the continued estimated cost savings from reduced reliance on prescriptions ($20,665) surpassed the average price-standardized total episode cost of bariatric surgery ($14,832). These results provide evidence of statewide clinical outcome improvement and cost savings for Type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery. A summary of this return-on-investment analysis was developed and publicized by MBSC and MVC in August 2022.

Figure 1.

This analysis was also evidence of the opportunities for cross-collaboration and information sharing in obesity care—between primary care providers, chronic disease management care teams, and bariatric surgeons; between collaborative quality initiatives with varying clinical, value-based, and socioeconomic focuses; and between providers, their patient, and their patient’s families. Obesity is a clinical diagnosis with extensive social complexities and implications for one’s physical and mental health. Improving support and care for those in seek of treatment requires intentional, innovative collaboration.

The complete recording of Dr. Varban’s recent MVC Health in Action workgroup presentation and the discussion that followed are available on MVC’s YouTube channel. Those with questions about any of the above-mentioned materials or analyses are welcome to contact the MVC Coordinating Center at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu. MVC’s next workgroup takes place on Tues., Jan. 24, from 11 a.m. - 12 p.m., featuring a guest presentation by Karla Stoermer Grossman, MSA, BSN, RN, AE-C, Clinical Site Coordinator at the Inspiring Health Advances in Lung Care (INHALE) Collaborative Quality Initiative. Register to join us and hear about INHALE’s approach to improving outcomes for patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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Latest PO Joint Replacement Report Adds Outpatient Rehab Rates, Demographics, and More

Latest PO Joint Replacement Report Adds Outpatient Rehab Rates, Demographics, and More

MVC proudly partners with 40 physician organizations (PO) spanning the state of Michigan and continues to refine and add to the resources tailored to these members. As part of this work, MVC recently refreshed and shared PO joint replacement reports in December. These PO-level reports were first shared in October 2021 with a focus on the shift away from inpatient surgeries as well as post-acute care utilization for combined joint procedures.

The recently refreshed reports carried forward many of the joint episode metrics included previously, but with additional stratification and detail. For instance, whereas the 2021 version presented figures for all joint surgeries combined, many of the figures in the December 2022 version provided data stratified by hip procedure, knee procedure, and all joint procedures. Similarly, some figures are stratified by the location of the procedure (inpatient vs. outpatient). This new differentiation was intended to help POs more easily understand the underlying drivers of their metrics. For example, the blinded hospital below (Figure 1) could observe that its average 30-day price-standardized total episode payment is driven more by hip surgeries ($17,399) than knee surgeries ($16,643). This site could also observe that its overall total episode payment is below both the collaborative-wide PO average and the average in their region, and at the average for other POs of a similar size.

Figure 1.

Additional detail was also added to the patient attribution table, which now identifies the top 10 index facilities (rather than five) where a PO’s attributed patients underwent joint replacement surgery. This table now also includes each index facility’s percent of joint episodes performed in an outpatient setting as well as their average 30-day price-standardized total episode payment for attributed patients. This change was intended to inform quality improvement discussions between POs and partner hospitals or Ambulatory Surgical Centers (ASCs).

Also new to this report were 30-day outpatient rehabilitation rates and a patient population snapshot table to help POs better understand the demographics of patients included in the report. The table included mean age, top two patient Zip codes, the percent of patients living in an “at-risk” or “distressed” Zip code according to the Distressed Communities Index, the proportion of patients belonging to different racial categories, their average length of stay, and their 30-day post-surgery complication rate. Each of these categories was summarized separately by insurance plan.

This report utilized administrative claims from attributed members spanning 1/1/19 – 6/30/21 for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) PPO Commercial, BCBSM Medicare Advantage, and Medicare Fee-for-Service. Reports were prepared for all POs that participate in MVC and had at least 20 joint replacement episodes in 2019 and 2020, and at least 11 episodes in the first half of 2021.

In general, report findings indicated that utilization of outpatient surgery settings continued to increase in 2021 on average (Figure 2). However, there was still significant variation between MVC’s 40 PO members in their average rate of joint replacement surgeries taking place in outpatient settings (Figure 3). For joint episodes in 2019 through the first half of 2021, outpatient surgery rates ranged from just over 20% to nearly 80%.

Figure 2.

Figure 3.

On average across the collaborative, POs still had low rates of skilled nursing facility (SNF) utilization (6.7%) and higher rates of home health (HH) utilization (55.3%). However, variation in PO member HH utilization rates ranged from approximately 10% to 90%.

If you have feedback on your new PO joint replacement report or would like to request an additional custom analysis to better fit your needs, contact the Coordinating Center at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.

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MVC Q4 Newsletter Highlights EOY Success Stories

MVC Q4 Newsletter Highlights EOY Success Stories

The Michigan Value Collaborative's quarterly newsletter provides in-depth synopses of MVC events, updates, and spotlights on members and partners. The final newsletter of 2022 was released this week (Figure 1), summarizing the activities and accomplishments that took place in Q4 of this year. First and foremost, the Coordinating Center thanked its members for their partnership in what turned out to be a very active year and highlighted new additions to the collaborative, including new hospital member Bronson Lakeview Paw Paw and new MVC Site Engagement Coordinator Kristy Degener.

Figure 1. Page 1 of MVC December Newsletter for Q4 of 2022

This edition included a full synopsis of MVC's 2022 Fall Semi-Annual Meeting, outlining the unblinded data session and the topics covered by the many talented and inspiring guest speakers. It also called attention to important updates that will impact Program Years 2024-2025 of the MVC Component of the BCBSM Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program, outlining some aspects of the program structure that are changing and some that are staying the same as previous program cycles. Finally, the December newsletter highlighted the large portfolio of work that was taken on by MVC staff in partnership with its peer Collaborative Quality Initiatives (CQIs), highlighting in particular four completed return-on-investment analyses and several spotlights on the MVC blog.

The publication of MVC's final newsletter in Q4 coincides with MVC's submission of its end-of-year progress report to funder BCBSM. In developing this impressive summary document, MVC developed an infographic that highlights key statistics and accomplishments from the past six months (Figure 2). MVC plans to distribute a public version of this summary report, MVC's Annual Report, in January 2023. In the meantime, read the full MVC Q4 December Newsletter here.

Figure 2. Summary Infographic of MVC Activity, 7/1/22-12/31/22

The MVC Coordinating Center looks forward to continuing its work in 2023 and wishes everyone a happy holiday season and new year!

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PY 2024-2025 Selection Reports Sent for MVC Component of BCBSM P4P Program

PY 2024-2025 Selection Reports Sent for MVC Component of BCBSM P4P Program

Beginning in 2018, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) allocated 10% of its Pay-For-Performance (P4P) Program to a metric based on Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) claims data. In 2022, the BCBSM P4P Quarterly Workgroup approved changes to how hospitals are evaluated in future program cycles. The upcoming two-year cycle including Program Years (PYs) 2024 and 2025 will be the first impacted by these changes, with performance years in 2023 and 2024, respectively (see Figure 1). Hospitals received selection reports for the next cycle this week to aid in their decision-making on metrics within the new program structure.

Figure 1.

What is staying the same?

The program will continue to be scored out of 10 points maximum, and hospitals will continue to be evaluated on their risk-adjusted, price-standardized total episode payment, though this will make up a smaller component of the overall program. In addition, most conditions hospitals could select previously for episode payment scoring will still be available for that component of the program. Those include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), colectomy (non-cancer), congestive heart failure (CHF), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), joint replacement, and pneumonia. Additionally, a hospital’s metric selections will continue to be scored on improvement compared to the hospital’s own past performance and scored on achievement related to an MVC cohort. Each hospital will continue to be awarded the greater of the two scores, either improvement or achievement, which are calculated using Z-scores. Cohort designation is still based on bed size, critical access status, and case mix index.

What is changing?

The PY 2022-2023 program was scored out of 10 points, but 12 points could be earned (10 points from episode spending plus two bonus points). In PYs 2024-2025, the overall program structure (Figure 2) will change so that the maximum score will be 10 points, made up of a maximum of four points from an episode spending metric, a maximum of four points from a value metric (a new component), and a maximum of two points from engagement activities completed in the program year (the calendar year following the performance year). This means that rather than selecting two conditions as in previous program cycles, hospitals will now select one condition for the episode spending metric and select one value metric. In order to be eligible to select a payment condition or value metric, a hospital must be projected to have at least 20 cases in the full baseline year of 2021. No bonus points will be available for PYs 2024-2025.

Figure 2.

Brand new in PYs 2024-2025 will be value metrics, which are evidence-based, actionable measures that show variability across the state. Hospitals will be rewarded for high rates of high-value services or low rates of low-value services. Seven value metrics are available for hospitals to choose from: cardiac rehabilitation after CABG, cardiac rehabilitation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), seven-day follow-up after CHF, 14-day follow-up after COPD, seven-day follow-up after pneumonia, preoperative testing, and risk-adjusted readmission after sepsis. The preoperative testing value metric is composed of a group of three low-risk procedures: cholecystectomy, hernia repair, and lumpectomy. Each procedure will be scored separately, and points for this value metric will be awarded based on the highest points achieved for a hospital’s eligible procedures.

Finally, engagement in MVC activities will be built into the program’s scoring structure, rather than being offered as “bonus” points. Hospitals will be eligible to earn up to two points by attending and participating in MVC activities throughout each program year. These points are intended to increase engagement with other hospitals and the MVC Coordinating Center. Hospitals may select their own combination of activities but must include at least one activity from each of the attendance and participation categories to earn any points.

The P4P selection reports distributed this week include tables for the various episode spending and value metrics that identify projected case counts, the hospital’s average payment or rate of utilization, the cohort and MVC All average payments or rates, and the projected changes necessary for the hospital to earn 1 – 4 points. Accompanying the reports was an interpretation guide to walk recipients through a blinded sample report. It includes guidance on how to interpret the tables with suggestions for how this data could be used to inform a hospital’s P4P selections. The guide can be viewed here.

A complete summary of changes to PYs 2024 and 2025 is available here. These changes will not be retroactively applied to PYs 2022-2023. For complete details about PYs 2024-2025, please refer to the P4P Technical Document. Contact the MVC Coordinating Center with any questions. MVC requests that member hospitals complete and submit their PY 2024-2025 selections by December 23, 2022.

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Happy Thanksgiving from the MVC Coordinating Center

Happy Thanksgiving from the MVC Coordinating Center

The Michigan Value Collaborative wishes you a happy Thanksgiving holiday. Thank you to all Michigan hospitals and physician organizations for working tirelessly every day to improve healthcare quality across Michigan. We are grateful for your partnership and your efforts on behalf of Michigan patients.

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Latest Sepsis Report Compares Medicare Advantage and Medicare FFS Patient Outcomes

Latest Sepsis Report Compares Medicare Advantage and Medicare FFS Patient Outcomes

The Michigan Value Collaborative distributed refreshed push reports this week for its sepsis service line, providing hospital members with updated figures and measures since the last refresh in April.

The version shared with members this week compares MVC hospitals on 90-day risk-adjusted total episode payments, inpatient length of stay, Intensive Care Unit (ICU)/Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) utilization, inpatient mortality and discharge to hospice, 90-day post-acute care utilization, and 90-day readmission rates. Each figure presented reflects 90-day episodes with index admissions from 7/1/18 – 6/30/21 for Medicare Fee-For-Service (FFS), Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) PPO Commercial, Blue Care Network (BCN) Commercial, BCBSM PPO Medicare Advantage (MA), and BCN MA. Most of the measures also include comparison groups for the "MVC All” average across the collaborative as well as the average for each hospital’s assigned geographic region of Michigan.

This week’s reports stratified many measures by BCBSM/BCN Medicare Advantage and traditional Medicare FFS to investigate differences in outcomes and utilization between these two patient groups. MA saw large increases in yearly enrollment over the last decade, resulting in a growing interest in the difference in quality and cost measures compared to traditional Medicare FFS. Recent research suggested that MA patients experience better outcomes and cost less. This held true for some of the measures in MVC’s latest report. Despite the fact that the MA population is older (77 years) than the Medicare FFS population (72 years), the 90-day readmission rate (see Figure 1) among Medicare FFS sepsis patients was higher (33%) than that of MA sepsis patients (27%).

Figure 1.

Other noticeable differences between the patient populations included disease burden and social barriers. The Medicare FFS population had a greater comorbidity burden than the MA population; 57% of MA patients had three or more comorbidities whereas 61% of the Medicare FFS population had three or more comorbidities. The Medicare FFS population was also more likely to reside in an at-risk or distressed Zip code according to the Distressed Communities Index (37% vs. 31%).

Interestingly, the average 90-day risk-adjusted total episode spending payment among sepsis patients was higher for MA ($38,314) than Medicare FFS ($34,434) (see Figure 2). However, the claims data used in MVC’s report were both price standardized and risk adjusted, so dollars are actually a proxy for healthcare utilization. When taking into account patient factors and payer, BCBSM/BCN MA sepsis patients used more resources than Medicare FFS sepsis patients. Without taking patient factors and payer into account, Medicare FFS sepsis patients used more resources than BCBSM/BCN MA sepsis patients.

Figure 2.

Hospitals can learn more about the differing demographics of these two populations and their BCBSM/BCN commercial counterparts in their patient population snapshot table, a figure that was carried forward from the April reports. The latest reports included additional rows for the rate of septic shock and for the percentage of patients living in an “at-risk” or “distressed” Zip code. The latter is determined by the Economic Innovation Group’s Distressed Communities Index (DCI) data set, which incorporates economic indicators such as education, employment, and income to categorize patient Zip codes as prosperous, comfortable, mid-tier, at-risk, or distressed. The population snapshot table was intended to help hospitals better understand their sepsis patient population. The other demographics included were race, mean age, top three patient Zip codes, the most frequent and average number of comorbidities, and the proportion of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.

The inclusion of COVID-positive patient percentages is an important statistic in the patient population snapshot table since the report included COVID patients. Knowing this percentage could help hospitals understand the extent to which their data is driven (or not) by patients with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis.

The latest sepsis reports were also distributed to members of the Michigan Hospital Medicine Safety Consortium (HMS), which partnered with MVC on the original development of this service line for MVC’s registry. MVC plans to provide system-level versions of the latest sepsis report in the coming weeks.

If you have suggestions on how these reports can be improved or the data made more actionable, the Coordinating Center would love to hear from you. We are also seeking feedback on how collaborative members are using this information in their quality improvement projects. Please reach out at Michigan-Value-Collaborative@med.umich.edu.

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MVC Celebrates Achievements for National Healthcare Quality Week

As the conclusion of National Healthcare Quality Week approaches, MVC is proud to honor healthcare quality professionals for their unique contributions toward service delivery and improvements in healthcare facilities. Thus far in 2022, much was achieved by MVC staff, members, and partners. Collectively, these teams work to improve outcomes for patients in a way that doesn’t add to the burden of healthcare costs. This week is an opportunity to celebrate those achievements and express gratitude to the dedicated professionals whose hard work made them possible.

MVC strives to help its members better understand their performance using robust multi-payer data, customized analytics, and at-the-elbow support. MVC has been active in each of these areas (summarized in Figure 1) thanks to MVC’s dedicated Coordinating Center staff. Of note is the fact that MVC distributed 16 push reports to 100+ hospitals and 40 physician organizations (POs) so far this year, and prepared 19 custom analytic reports in response to specific member requests. These data help identify areas of opportunity and trends over time that—in conjunction with other internal and external data sets—inform quality improvement initiatives underway at hospitals and POs across the state.

Figure 1.

MVC previously published a detailed mid-year summary of its activities from January to June of 2022, which is available here. Since then, MVC distributed five additional push reports, three of which were new to the collaborative in recent months:

  • Hospital hysterectomy report – new push report!
  • Preoperative testing report refresh
  • Emergency department and post-acute care report – new push report!
  • MVC Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program Year 2022 mid-year scorecards
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease report for POs – new push report!

MVC’s P4P Program mid-year scorecards also highlighted the extraordinary work taking place at hospitals across Michigan. The MVC Component of the BCBSM P4P Program evaluates each participating hospital’s risk-adjusted, price-standardized episode payments for two selected conditions by measuring improvement over time and achievement relative to their peers. At the conclusion of Program Year 2021, hospitals in the collaborative contributed to an overall price-standardized decrease in payments from 2018 to 2020 for the selected P4P conditions of $7.7 million.

Figure 2.

The average points scored for the recent mid-year scorecards was 5.9/10 before including the survey bonus points—0.9 points higher than the average points scored at the conclusion of Program Year 2021. These points reflect tangible improvements to service delivery and patient outcomes, such as reduced readmissions or shifting post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNF) to home health following joint replacement surgery.

To help facilitate practice sharing among members, MVC workgroups have continued to be a valuable activity, with 28 virtual workgroups completed as of this week. Workgroup topics offered in 2022 include chronic disease management, diabetes, health equity, health in action (ad hoc topics), joint replacement, and sepsis. Quality improvement is a team effort, so MVC is extraordinarily grateful to the long list of members and partners who shared their expertise and time by presenting. Thank you to the following organizations for presenting to the collaborative at an MVC workgroup thus far in 2022:

  • Area Agency on Aging
  • Ascension Genesys
  • Beaumont Dearborn
  • Bronson Healthcare
  • Henry Ford Health
  • Michigan Social Health Interventions to Eliminate Disparities (MSHIELD)
  • Munson Healthcare
  • Olympia Medical, LLC
  • Sparrow Health System
  • Spectrum Health
  • Spectrum Health Medical Group
  • Trinity Health Muskegon
  • Washtenaw County Health Department

As hospitals and POs press ahead to improve the quality of care delivered in 2022, MVC is eager to support your important work. If you have a follow-up question about a report, please contact MVC to discuss a custom analysis. If you have benefitted from or are looking for guidance on a quality initiative, please reach out so MVC can connect you with members undertaking similar initiatives. MVC thanks you for your tireless work, and looks forward to a continued partnership in 2023.

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MVC Releases Its Fall Semi-Annual Agenda, Speaker Topics

MVC Releases Its Fall Semi-Annual Agenda, Speaker Topics

The MVC Coordinating Center recently released the full agenda for its forthcoming Fall 2022 Semi-Annual Meeting, which takes place in Lansing at the Radisson Hotel on Friday, October 28, 2022, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. MVC holds collaborative-wide meetings twice each year to bring together quality leaders and clinicians from across the state. This meeting’s theme of “Prescribing Health in Michigan” will support attendees in learning strategies to drive evidence-based medication utilization and support patient access to medications through the implementation and evaluation of quality improvement projects.

Speakers at semi-annual events are often members who share their successes, challenges, barriers, and solutions in pursuing a higher value and quality of care. The speakers this fall represent a variety of stakeholder groups, including member hospitals and physician organizations (POs), pharmacy experts, pain management experts, and of course MVC Coordinating Center leadership.

The keynote presentation will be given by Dr. Lindsey Kelley, Associate Chief of Pharmacy at Michigan Medicine. She also serves as Program Director for the PGY1 Community Pharmacy Residency and adjunct faculty at the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. Dr. Kelley earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Arizona in Tucson. She completed a pharmacy practice residency at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, MN, and received her MS from the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy while completing a two-year Health-System Pharmacy Administration and Leadership residency at the University of Minnesota Health. Dr. Kelley has been an active member of national pharmacy associations, state affiliates, and advisory councils. She was also honored with the ASHP New Practitioners Forum Distinguished Service Award in 2010 and recognized as a fellow in 2019. Her presentation will focus on improving patient care through better access to high-cost and complex medications.

MVC members will also hear presentations from their peer hospitals and POs about pharmacy initiatives implemented at other sites. Dr. Troy Shirley, System Director of Pharmacy at Bronson Healthcare, will present on improving health equity through pharmacy-based initiatives. Dr. Tiffany Jenkins, Director of Population Health Pharmacy at Trinity Health Alliance of Michigan, will present on population health pharmacy initiatives within a PO.

The Opioid Prescribing Engagement Network (OPEN) will touch on pain management best practices and resources. They are represented by Dr. Mark Bicket, Co-Director of OPEN and Assistant Professor in the Division of Pain Research in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Michigan. His presentation will focus on improving medication adherence for surgical pain management.

Attendees can also expect to hear from MVC Coordinating Center leadership and staff about the MVC Component of the BCBSM Pay-for-Performance (P4P) Program, unblinded data on prescribing practices across the collaborative, new conditions and data sources that are available to members on the registry and in push reports, MVC’s new Qualified Entity status and resulting patient-level Medicare data, and updates about other upcoming MVC events. The guest presentations will be followed by a panel discussion about medication adherence facilitated by MVC leadership.

At the conclusion of the meeting, attendees will have learned approaches to improving medication access and utilization, patient experience, treatment adherence, care transitions, post-discharge support, patient education, reduced readmissions, and health equity. The full agenda can be accessed online here.

These presentations would be informative and applicable for any of the following stakeholders who are invited to attend:

  • MVC hospital site coordinators
  • MVC PO site coordinators
  • Quality leadership
  • Physicians
  • Nurse practitioners
  • Pharmacists
  • Community-based organizations or social workers
  • CQI staff

CME CREDITS AVAILABLE

The University of Michigan Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The University of Michigan Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Those interested in attending this informative and collaborative meeting should register here. The MVC Coordinating Center looks forward to a fantastic meeting. See you there!

Activity Planners

Hari Nathan, MD, PhD; Deborah Evans, RN; Erin Conklin, MPA; Chelsea Pizzo, MPH; Chelsea Andrews, MPH